Posts Tagged "David Allen"

Qualities that Make a Good Board Member

Posted by on May 16, 2017 in Board Development, Featured | Comments Off on Qualities that Make a Good Board Member

Qualities that Make a Good Board Member

I just returned from a stellar week at River Rally – the national conference for river advocacy groups. I was there to teach, obviously, but I got a chance to learn a lot too. Green Infrastructure, the on-going plight of the people from Flint, a behind-the-scenes look at what happened at Standing Rock, and plenty of opportunities to see the world through other people’s eyes. Great stuff. My session was about major gift fundraising (of course), and I came to the part where board members need to give themselves first. How can we ask people to give when we are not willing or able to give...

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Membership Discounts and Other Crazy Stuff

Posted by on Apr 18, 2017 in Featured, Membership | Comments Off on Membership Discounts and Other Crazy Stuff

Membership Discounts and Other Crazy Stuff

Well-Meaning Tom: Thanks for all your help. Per yesterday’s meeting, I’ve set up a Doodle poll for selection of our date for the full day meeting. DA: What does this mean? “Membership special – 50% off new and renewals March 28 – June 3!” (It was in your email signature.) It sounds like you are offering half off memberships. Well-Meaning Tom: Yep. The membership committee increased our membership rates last year from $50 per household to $110 per household, and added additional layers of membership above and below that, with varying benefits. For instance, I mentioned the retail discount...

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In-Kind Contributions Need Systems, Too

Posted by on Apr 11, 2017 in Donor Cultivation, Featured, Membership | 1 comment

In-Kind Contributions Need Systems, Too

For most land trusts, getting stuff for free often means the difference between having what you need and not. Donations of furniture, office equipment, vehicles, printing, and services (especially legal and accounting) can be a Godsend. They can also make life difficult in some unforeseen ways. You should have a system in place for cultivating, soliciting, and acknowledging such “non-cash” gifts. For new organizations, getting started on the right foot is important. For more established organizations, a systems tune-up might help.   Here are several things to keep in mind:   You...

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How Much is Your Obsession with Overhead Costing You?

Posted by on Apr 4, 2017 in Donor Cultivation, Featured, Plans and Budgets, Uncategorized | 6 comments

How Much is Your Obsession with Overhead Costing You?

Let’s say you get fundraising letters from two different land trusts with similar missions and similar geographies. The first raises $150,000 per year and brags that 95% of every dollar goes to programs. The second raises $500,000 per year, and you learn from Guidestar that they have a 25% overhead. Which one are you more impressed with? Which one should you be more impressed with? Which one would you give to? Would you support the land trust that is actively using $142,500 to protect land every year or to the organization that is using $375,000? Now turn the scenario around. Compared with...

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Is Your Acknowledgement Process like a Torn Seat Cover?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in Communication, Donor Cultivation, Featured, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Is Your Acknowledgement Process like a Torn Seat Cover?

Is Your Acknowledgement Process like a Torn Seat Cover?

Picture this: Small land trust organization, but large enough to have staff. Executive Director is terrific but does everything and lives some miles away. Sometimes works from home and is often out of the office. Part-time Administrative Assistant (AA) – 15 hours a week. No other staff. AA picks up the mail twice a week from the post office and separates out the envelopes that obviously contain checks. Those envelopes will need to be opened in the presence of a second individual. They go into a locked file drawer. Most weeks, on Friday, the AA is joined by a volunteer. Any checks not...

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